Sacramento native group holds march for indigenous peoples

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Hundreds march in Sacramento to bring awareness to murdered and missing indigenous people

In 2018, an Associated Press investigation found that 633 indigenous women made up 0.7 percent of open missing persons cases.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Hundreds of people took to the streets of Sacramento Saturday, marching to bring awareness to murdered and missing indigenous people.

Several local groups were behind the march, including the Sacramento Native American Health Center (SNAHC) and Wilton Rancheria Tribe.

The groups who participated called it a “Prayer Walk.” They hope that this turns into an event that will be held annually.

The organization Native Sisters Circle Sacramento said the event is to create a space of healing and awareness.

In 2018, an Associated Press investigation found that 633 indigenous women made up 0.7% of open missing persons cases, while indigenous women make up 0.4% of the U.S. population.

“There are a lot of missing and murdered coming up on reservations,” Leticia Aguilar, founder of Native Sisters Circle Sacramento, said. “It’s not just here in Sacramento, it’s nationwide. This has been an ongoing problem.”

Aguilar said that the problem is an issue both on and off reservations.

She said that plans are being made for a similar prayer march in Redding.

Right now, Aguilar says that the best way people can support the Native American community is to help bring visibility to the ongoing issue.

To find out more about each of the organizations, click on their websites below:

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